Why Changing Careers is Good For You

Do you have your dream job?

If you answer “yes,” you’re one of only 14 percent of people who do. A study for the University of Phoenix in the U.S.A. shows that workers of all ages are unhappy with their careers.

Eighty percent of people in their 20s and 64 percent of people in their 30s wish for a career change. So what’s stopping them?

Face the Fear

The answer is very likely fear. We get used to being in the jobs we’re in, and changing career often feels like a mountain we’re too afraid to move.

But many people are in the completely wrong job for them. It’s not really surprising, as we are so young when we make career choices and they affect the rest of our working lives.

A lot of people end up drifting into jobs that have been chosen for them because they’re not ready to make their career decisions themselves.

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Know It’s Never Too Late

People also avoid changing career because they believe they’re too old, even if they’re desperately unhappy in their job.  (Click to Tweet)

They think people will laugh at them for wanting to retrain, or that they’ll be slower to learn than their younger counterparts. But this belief is actually wrong.

At KKTC we talk to lots of people over 40 and over 50. Many have teenage or early adult children and have been stay-at-home mums, or worked in occupations that are not fulfilling.

When we talk about their experiences we help them unlock their true passion in life. They discover that becoming an educator and engaging with children will bring them great satisfaction and enjoyment.

These conversations are inspiring – it’s like a new energy has surrounded their soul in the space of a conversation. The joy of working with children and helping shape developing minds … now that is real personal fulfilment and meaning.

Studies show that over 80 percent of people who change career after the age of 45 are successful in their new fields. And the people who make that leap are happier and better off than they were before.

Make Your Life Work For You

Career coach Kathy Caprino is often approached by women who want to change careers. She asks them to step back and analyse what’s stopping them from making the jump into a career they’ll really enjoy.

Often it’s a lack of confidence.

“Until you let go of what you’re doing and thinking that keeps you stuck and small, you can’t build a happy, successful career,” she says. She advises them to learn about the field they want to go into and find some friendly, helpful people who have experience of the industry.

Build up a realistic picture of your new field by talking to these people. If it still feels like a good fit, it’s time to start making plans.

Changing careers doesn’t have to be hard.

Reconnect With Your Inner Child

Working in Early Childhood Education and Learning can be an ideal career. (Click to Tweet)

You can reconnect with who you truly are. You know, the person you were before you set foot on a career that was wrong for you.

Being around children will help you to rediscover your own inner child. And you’re likely to rediscover the joy in your own life.

So join us for our next information night. You can talk to people in the industry, and discover for yourself how we boost our students’ confidence and support them to live their dreams.

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Tim Ferriss’s Top Tips for Beating Procrastination

How do you beat procrastination when it’s got you in it’s python-like grip?

It’s hard. Everyone procrastinates, but some people seem to be able to throw it off and get stuff done.

Like Tim Ferris – author of The 4-Hour Workweek. Tim has written four #1 New York Times and Wall Street bestsellers, created TV Series and run successful businesses – but guess what?

He still procrastinates like the rest of us. He just has an arsenal of tools to help him wrench back control.

Want to know what they are? He shares them in this short video.

Here are the key points he shares.

1.   Break Down Projects

Large projects can be overwhelming, so break them down into smaller, more manageable pieces.

2.   Get Super-Specific

Get really specific. Instead of making your goal ‘get a new job’ or ‘change careers’ work out exactly what you’ll do by when.

It’s it easier to achieve goals that are targeted, like ‘research early childhood careers’ and ‘attend an information evening’. You can put time frames next to these specific tasks, too.

3.   Establish Your Next Move

If you’re not sure what your next move should be Tim says to think about what would make the rest of the tasks easier. Is there something on the list that will help you take action?

4.   Make It Easy

Think about how you can make things easy for yourself. Ask yourself, ‘What is the easiest way of achieving that outcome?’

5.   Make Yourself Accountable

Try to find ways to make yourself to commit to achieving your goals. That might mean having an accountability partner or making appointments with yourself.

If you’re studying, see if you can partner up with another student and be accountability partners for each other. That way you’ll both be on track.

Beat Procrastination and Reach For The Stars

So now you know how to unwrap the python of procrastination, imagine what you can achieve.

You might enrol in a new course.

You might find a fabulous new career.

You might even achieve things you only dreamed were possible.

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